Active investors may be taking a second look at shares of Australian Vanadium Limited (AVL.AX). Checking in on some levels, the six month price index is currently at 0.458333. The six month price index is measured by dividing the current share price by the share price six months ago. A ratio above one indicates an increase in the stock price over the six month time frame. A ratio under one signals that the price has lowered over that same time frame.

Investors often closely follow fundamental and technical data. Even with all the evidence, it can be tough to determine if the economy and the markets are preparing for a whole new breakout run. With the recent trend resulting in a series of new all-time record highs, investors will have to put the pieces together to try and gauge how long the second longest bull market in history will continue. Some professionals are still wondering if the next recession is looming, and if a bear market is right around the corner. Investors commonly strive to locate the highest probability of success. The next goal may be to capitalize on what could become the most interesting part of the record bull market. Investors will most likely be concentrating on what has proven to work in the past, which may offer a better idea as to how successful the strategies will be heading into the second half of the year and beyond.

We can also take a look at some stock volatility data on shares of Australian Vanadium Limited (AVL.AX). The 12 month volatility is currently 75.625. The 6 month volatility is noted at 86.5768, and the 3 month is recorded at 99.5801. When following the volatility of a stock, investors may be challenged with trying to decipher the correct combination of risk-reward to help maximize returns. As with any strategy, it is important to carefully consider risk and other market factors that might be in play when examining stock volatility levels.

Investors may be looking at the Piotroski F-Score when doing value analysis. The F-Score was developed to help find company stocks that have solid fundamentals, and to separate out weaker companies. Piotroski’s F-Score uses nine tests based on company financial statements. Australian Vanadium Limited (AVL.AX) currently has a Piotroski F-Score of 2. One point is given for piece of criteria that is met. Typically, a stock with a high score of 8 or 9 would be seen as strong, and a stock scoring on the lower end between 0 and 2 would be viewed as weaker.

Investors may have a solid plan in place to start trading the equity market. Sometimes, these plans never get to be fully realized because of the lack of discipline in the early stages. When a new investor goes into the red right out the gate, there can be a tendency to take on too much risk trying to get back to even. This may result in the investor abandoning the plan and making too many unreasonable trades with exorbitant expectations. Finding the self control to not get discouraged with early losses may help the investor stick to the plan and eventually start achieving longer-term goals.

The FCF Yield 5yr Average is calculated by taking the five year average free cash flow of a company, and dividing it by the current enterprise value. Enterprise Value is calculated by taking the market capitalization plus debt, minority interest and preferred shares, minus total cash and cash equivalents. The average FCF of a company is determined by looking at the cash generated by operations of the company. The Free Cash Flow Yield 5 Year Average of Australian Vanadium Limited (AVL.AX) is -0.167353.

Altman Z

Australian Vanadium Limited (AVL.AX) currently has an Altman Z score of 0.459359. The Z-Score for predicting bankruptcy was published in 1968 by Edward I. Altman, who was assistant professor of finance at New York University at that time. It measures the financial health of a company based on a set of income and balance sheet values. The Altman Z-Score predicts the probability that a firm will go bankrupt within 2 years. In its initial test, the Altman Z-Score was found to be 72% accurate in predicting bankruptcy two years before the event. In a series of subsequent tests, the model was found to be approximately 80%–90% accurate in predicting bankruptcy one year before the event.

Book to Market

A ratio used to find the value of a company by comparing the book value of a firm to its market value. Book value is calculated by looking at the firm’s historical cost, or accounting value. Market value is determined in the stock market through its market capitalization.

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